Procedures

Colonoscopy:

A colonoscopy is an examination of the lower gastrointestinal tract, which is called the colon or large intestine (bowel). A colonoscopy is a safe procedure that provides information that other tests may not be able to give

What to expect: An intravenous line (IV) will be started to administer medications. Patients are given a combination of a sedative(to help patient relax) and a narcotic(to prevent discomfort). Vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and blood oxygen level) will be monitored before, during, and after examination.

The Procedure: The procedure typically takes between 15-20 minutes. The colonoscopy is performed while the patient lies on their left side.

The colonoscope is a flexible tube, approximately the width of an index finger. The scope has a lens and light source that allows Dr. Lin to look into the scope or a TV monitor. The endoscope contains channels that allow Dr. Lin to obtain biopsies, remove polyps and to introduce or withdraw fluid or air.

Air is introduced through the scope to open up the colon so that the scope can be moved foward and to allow Dr. Lin to see. Patients may experience a sensation of bloating or gas cramps from the air as it distends the colon.

Recovery: After the colonoscopy, patients will be observed for 1-2 hours while the sedative medication wears off. The medication can cause most patients to temporarily feel tired or have difficultly concentrating. Patients should not drive or return to work after the procedure. The most common discomfort after the exam is a feeling of bloating and gas cramps. Most patients are able to eat a regular diet after the exam. Patients should ask about when it is safe to restart aspirin or blood thinning medications prior to being discharged.


Suprep


Consent Form

EGD:

An upper endoscopy, often referred to as EGD or esophagogastroduodenoscopy, is a procedure that allows a physician to directly examine the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (the first section of the small intestine).

What to expect: An intravenous line will be started to administer medications. Patients are given a combination of a sedative(to help patient relax) and a narcotic(to prevent discomfort). Vital signs(blood pressure, heart rate, and blood oxygen level) will be monitored before, during, and after examination.

The Procedure: The procedure typically take between 10-20 minutes to complete. The endoscopy is performed while the patient lies on their left side. Dr. Lin will give a medication to numb the throat and a plastic mouth guard is placed between the teeth to prevent damage to the teeth and scope.

The endoscope is a flexible tube this is about the width of a finger. The scope has a lens and light source that allows Dr. Lin to look into the scope to see the inner lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract, or to view it on a TV monitor.

Dr. Lin may take tissue samples called biopsies(not painful), or perform specific treatments (such as dilation, removal of polyps, treatment of bleeding).

Recovery: After the EGD, patients will be observed for 1-2 hours while the sedative medication wears off. The medication can cause most patients to temporarily feel tired or have difficulty concentrating. Patients should not drive or return to work after the procedure. The most common discomfort after the exam is a mild sore throat. Most patients are able to eat shortly after the procedure.


Instructions for EGD


Consent Form

ERCP:

What is ERCP?

(Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography), or ERCP, is a specialized technique used to study the ducts of the gallbladder, pancreas and liver. Ducts are drainage routes; the drainage channels from the liver are called bile or biliary ducts.

What can I expect during ERCP?

During ERCP, your doctor will pass an endoscope through your mouth, esophagus and stomach into the duodenum (first part of the small intestine). An endoscope is a thin, flexible tube that lets your doctor see inside your bowels. After your doctor sees the common opening to ducts from the liver and pancreas, your doctor will inject a contrast material (dye) into the pancreatic or biliary ducts and will take x-rays.
Your doctor might apply a local anesthetic to your throat or give you a sedative to make you more comfortable. Some patients also receive antibiotics before that procedure. You will lie on your left side on an x-ray table. Your doctor will pass the endoscope through your mouth, esophagus, and stomach and into the duodenum. The instrument does not interfere with breathing, but you might feel a bloating sensation because of the air introduced through the instrument.

What are possible complications of ERCP?

ERCP is a well-tolerated procedure when performed by doctors who are specially trained and experienced in the technique. Although complications requiring hospitalization can occur, they are uncommon. Complications can include pancreatitis (an inflammation or infection of the pancreas), infections bowel perforation and bleeding. Some patients can have an adverse reaction to the sedative used. Complications are often managed without surgery.

Risks vary, depending on why the test is performed, what is found during the procedure, what therapeutic intervention is undertaken, and whether a patient has major medical problems. Patients undergoing therapeutic ERCP, such as for stone removal, face a higher risk of complications than patients undergoing diagnostic ERCP. Your doctor will discuss your likelihood of complications before you undergo the test.

(ASGE) Important reminder: The preceding information is intended only to provide general information and not as a definitive basis for diagnosis or treatment in any particular case.